My Equipment

  1. Patrick Reilley says:

    You ain’t kidding about the value of a filter in protecting your lens. I was shooting on some rocks Sunday night and got a little careless. The wind picked up and I got caught with my hands in my camera bag while I watched my tripod slowly tip over with my less than week old 70-300mm attached.
    The expression on my face as I watched glass shatter against the rocks would have told you I had just watched my own child murdered. Then I realized the “glass” was the plastic of the filter. The lens hood took the initial impact and softened the blow. I had to remove the filter with a pair of pliers because it became cross threaded…….but the lens didn’t have a scratch on it! Thank god for filters.

    • Adam Allegro says:

      Amen. Most you can get from under $30. As far as quality, you do not need to spend the money on the most expensive type, the “low end” ones will do just fine at not cleaning out your wallet. Recommend Tiffen.

  2. Rob says:

    Ah, a Nikonian, eh? ;-) Awesome assortment of gear. Love my Tamron 10-24mm. One thing I’d recommend is a circular polarizing filter – it will saturate colors and make those puffy white clouds pop in landscapes. Also cut reflections. Oh, and some neutral density filters to stack for waterfalls or streams is pretty cool.

    I have done away with my UV filter on my 70-300mm. My experience is that that added glass lens really softens the image between 200 and 300mm. I got tired of removing it and replacing it, so now I have left it off for 2 years. now that I said this, I’m sure a disaster will strike it.

    • Adam Allegro says:

      Thanks Rob. I don’t have any graduated filters, but have been manipulating that aspect with aperture and shutter speed. I guess I can get one of filters to make it a bit easier… I have a circular polarizer for a few of my lenses, but need to start using it more. Thanks again for the advice!!

  3. Jay says:

    Hi,

    Love your work especially the fact that you travel to take photos. I am 20 and this is my passion. I hope to travel to Europe one day and backpack everywhere.I am in the military and you make it seem so easy to be a naval officer and travel. When i do travel to Europe after i get my nursing degree i will be using your site as a guide.

    I have a D7000 and D80 with the 50mm, 85mm, 18-55 lens kit and a 18-125. This is my first year doing photography and next year i plan on getting serious and buying the Tokina 11-16 and 80-200 2.8. I think you should take a look at the inexpensive but amazing Tokina lens.

    I admire your talent and skill and would like to do what you are doing today. Keep it up and best wishes during this holiday season.

    Merry Christmas,

    Jay

    • Adam Allegro says:

      Jay, first off I want to say thanks for all the wonderful comments – it makes me smile when I get stuff like this.

      It is easy to travel! Most people who think it is difficult just need to actually DO IT. You can easily find ways to travel on the cheap. Use your leave to travel. Look for deals on skyscanner.net (in Europe) or travelocity, etc… Also, try and get a billet in Europe, Asia, even Australia now. Please feel free to ask questions and comment on the posts whenever you want.

      I think the D7000 is a fine camera. I am waiting for the D800 to be released, so when that happens, I will be shooting full frame. The lenses you have are pretty much what i shot with my first year shooting. When I bought my 10-24mm it changed the way I look at the world, literally. The 14-24mm on a full frame is even more wider! I have many lenses now but really only use 3, and these are the ones I take traveling. 10-24mm, 18-300mm, and 50mm fixed (its an FX lens, but is by far the fastest, clearest lens I have ever used).

      My recommendation: If you feel your calling in photography, pursue it. You would be surprised how much you can do while still working or going to school full time. I have pretty much grown a full side business while working full time over the past 2.5 years. Use the navy. What I mean is take advantage of all the great places you can go. I wish I would have taken advantage of that when I was on one of my 4 deployments, stationed in Hawaii for 2 years, and even while I was stationed in Norfolk. There are so many amazing things in the states to photograph that I am actually itching to get back. Don’t get me wrong, Italy is fantastic, just ready for a change. I am getting out of the navy in Aug and am planning on traveling for a while. Stay tuned. Thanks again for the kind words and feel free to email me anytime if you have a question.

      1 more recommendation: Start a photoblog, get a Smugmug.com account, start getting your stuff out there. If you already have this stuff, let me know where it is and I will be happy to check it out. Good luck and happy holidays!

      -Adam

      • Jay says:

        I usually comment and never think that the blogger would actually reply to what i wrote. I like that you take time to reply to your fans it makes enjoying your work easier knowing you are humble.

        I would like to start blogging and getting a smugmug account but for now i am only known through my FB page and some photography groups on fb. If you want i can add you to the growing 4,000 plus Nikon D7000 group i am in on fb.

        I apologize because i didn’t give you enough information about me. I was active duty Air Force and now Army Reserve here at home. I live on a little island called Saipan and travel to and from a slightly bigger island called Guam. They are both beautiful places to visit and hope you do one day.

        I wish as well that i took up photography while i was in the U.S., (New Mexico and Texas) South Korea and Japan.

        I was going to purchase the D700 or D3X because i wanted full frame as well but from what i learned and have read is that getting an FX body won’t change your photos as much but getting better glass will. You are right about the 10-24 i am sure it is a spectacular lens and would like to own it one day. I am planning to move the money spent on a camera body towards glass because good glass barely depreciates in quality while a camera body drops prices in a matter of years.

        I only have a fb page for now and you can skim through my HDR style if you’d like. I went through a phase of trying to make my landscapes look like paintings and to some it is wrong to others it is considered free style but i have and i am still trying to get back to regular (non painting) photography.

        This is my page feel free to leave a comment. https://www.facebook.com/pages/VillaG-Photography/203876566316112

        Cheers,

        Jay

  4. Ketan says:

    Hi Adam,
    Happy New Year!
    Dropped in here from Daniel Joshi’s blog…and boy am i glad i foudn this place! there is so much to learn from you Adam! Though i am a Canon user, i do envy your gear collection! Each piece is well thought of and the results on the blog speak for themselves!

    I use the Canon 60D with a 18-135 mm lens, though i am now looking for another lens but am pretty much confused what next… any guidance will be helpful :)

    Do drop in when you can on my photoblog – http://ketanpandit.in/Click

    - Ketan

    • Adam Allegro says:

      Hey Ketan! Thanks for the awesome comment, I really appreciate it! Not sure if this will help, but I have a bunch of lenses, and only really use 3 now. I use my 28-300mm Zoom, 50mm 1.4 prime, and 10-24mm Wide Angle Zoom. For a traveling photographer like myself, this gives me amazing reach with the lens, and keeps my weight light. As far as actual shooting goes, I will use the 10-24mm about 75% of the time (being a landscape/cityscape guy, that gives me the most viewable area), and the other 2 lenses the rest of the time. I checked out your blog, nice stuff! I will pop by from time to time. Thanks for the visit and awesome comment!

  5. Nice equipment! Don’t see me having that many lenses! lol lol. But I DO want to get me the macro! They are expensive but one day I will have one…

  6. Julio Aponte says:

    I saw your article while browsing the net. There’s no doubt that Silver Effex
    Pro is the best for B&W. I use it a lot. Thank’s for sharing your awsome Basilica pictures. I live in the island of Puerto Rico, in the Caribbean, and
    hope sometime I can make it to Europe, and especially Italy. Keep up
    your good work. God Bless.

    • Adam Allegro says:

      Thank you very much Julio. Glad you enjoy the Silver Efex program! I love it! I would love to visit Puerto Rico one day! Feel free to subscribe to the blog, upper right column on my home page! Enjoy!

Leave a Reply

For all who are interested, my arsenal of photographic goodness is listed below.  Please let me know if you have any questions or want recommendations/advice!

Photomatix ProMy favorite HDR software available.  This is what I use to make my vivid, dynamic images.  You can get it HERE.

Silver EFEX ProThe best black and white conversion software available!  Save 15% on all NIK Software products here!

 

Nikon D800: My new love.  This camera does everything except cook you dinner.  36.3 MP, Full Frame, Video, awesome ISO performance, tremendous dynamic range, etc…  For only $3,000 it is an absolute steal.  For even more detail, the D800e comes with the AA filter removed, allowing the sensor to capture even more sharpness! BUY HERE

 

Nikon D7000:  My secondary camera, this baby is awesome.  Highly recommended for the beginner/amateur photographer.  Many pros even use it. Costs around $1200 for the body only, or you can buy with included 18-105mm Lens bundle.  Tremendously crisp, tons of functions, and even full HD video. BUY HERE

 

Nikon D90:  My backup camera, as well as a camera I usually keep my 105mm Macro Lens on (mostly because I am lazy and don’t want to bother changing lenses all the time).  This camera came out about 3 years ago and is still one of the best.  I have put mine through all types of wear and tear, bumps, drops, rain… It still works like a dream. BUY HERE

 

Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 Wide Angle:  This is my go-to lens for all landscape and seascape work, and has its place is almost all other aspects of my photography.  If you have a DX camera, this is a wonderful FX lens to own.  It really shines on a Full Frame camera; the angle of view is staggeringly large… BUY HERE

 

 

Nikon 28-300mm Lens:  My primary travel lens. extremely versatile and travel friendly, this does a great job covering a very wide range of zoom.  Not as fast a lens as a fixed focal length, but very crisp and versitile.  This can be used with both DX and FX sensor cameras and produces tremendous images with both! BUY HERE

 

Nikon 10-24mm Wide Angle Zoom:  My favorite lens, this offers the ability to create truly stunning images.  The amount of info this can capture is amazing.  Where it really shines is taking shots of Landscapes and Cityscapes.  Not exactly an “inexpensive” lens, I found it for around $900. BUY HERE

 

Nikon 105mm Macro Lens:  I love using this lens.  The clarity, versatility, and 105mm zoom make it the obvious choice for capturing vivid, clear photos of beautiful flowers and creepy little critters.  It is also a very fast medium range zoom, useful for facial close-ups, tightly focused landscapes, and nature photography.  Pretty pricy, around $900, but highly recommended. BUY HERE

 

Nikon 70-300mm Telephoto Lens:  A great alternative to the 28-300mm.  Not as sharp, but for the price, you cannot beat this lens.  It is very sturdy and will last forever.  A great entry-level zoom, with a great price tag. BUY HERE

 

Nikon 35mm Lens:  Uber-sharp and fast fixed focal length lens (say that 5 times fast), this provides me with the most enjoyment of all.  You really need to get up close and personal in order to get a compelling shot, a result of the traditional 35mm focal length.  When I am feeling lazy, this is the lens I avoid.  So how much could this awesome piece of photographic equipment cost you ask?  $199. BUY HERE

 

Gitzo Traveler Carbon Fiber Tripod THE perfect travel companion for a photographer.  Light, compact, and sturdier that most tripos twice its size.  The only down side of this tripod is the price.  With that being said, why would you put 4,000+ dollars worth of equipment on a tripod that isn’t quality made?? HIGHLY recommended.  BUY HERE

 

Slik Pro 780DX Tripod:  A bit costly for a tripod ($235), but sturdier than some of the tripods twice as much.  It will collapse to about 1.5 feet, and though it is a bit heavy, can fit nicely into a checked bag for traveling.  In order to keep a camera still for 30+ seconds to catch that precious light at night, a good tripod is essential.  This is also a must if you are bracketing for HDR shots (drop me a line if you want me to talk more about this).  Highly recommended. BUY HERE

 

Joby “Zoom” Gorrillapod:  It may look a bit quirky, but I have gotten some of the most unique shots with this little guy.  Incredibly sturdy when properly mounted (you can fix it to about anything), this tripod offers some amazing versatility you just cannot get with a traditional tripod.  These come in about 8 different models, ranging from little point and shoot holders to Full HD Video Recorders they use to film blockbuster movies.  The best for DSLR photography in my opinion is the $75 “Zoom” edition. BUY HERE

 

Lowepro Photo Sport Backpack My go-to bag for all daily photo excurions.  Light as a feather and able to store much more than you would think, this thing is built to take a berating.  As advertised, it is a perfect biking/running photo bag, but can even be used for weekend getaways. Comes in 2 sizes and colors.  For taller people, I recommend the bigger bag. BUY HERE

 

Tenba Camera Bag:  It seems when  you start getting serious about a hobby, you (or me anyways) have to have every new, unique, useless thing available.  Well, I can tell you this bag is anything but.  Enough room for 2 DSLR’s, 4 lenses, a plethora of batteries, memory cards, cleaning supplies, and other odds and ends.  All this contained inside a professional looking bag with customizable straps, compartments, and a silent opening top . Sells for around $125.  BUY HERE

 

OP Tech USA Pro Strap:  Nothing screams “tourist!” like a stock Nikon or Canon strap around your pricey DSLR camera.  Not a must have by any means, but besides being a useful addition, it comes with a bunch of perks that will make you happy you bought it.  Comfortable, long and flexible, quick disconnects, and all made in the US of A.  BUY HERE

 

Nikon Remote:  Get one of these in your bag of tricks.  I personally like this one because it is so small, wireless, and less than $15!  If you are shooting night photography, this is a must to prevent camera shake from depressing the shutter.  It is also cool to have so you aren’t running back and forth pressing the time release shutter if you want to be in the picture.  The battery lasts forever too (I think I am over 8000 exposures with it and it still hasn’t failed me).  BUY HERE

 

Giottos Rocketair:  This lens/sensor cleaner is effective, cheap, durable, and looks pretty cool to boot.  Made with a filter for incoming air, this blows off annoying dust without introducing anything new.  Cuts out all the spittle and leftover food that you blow on to your lens when trying to get rid of dust.  It sells on Amazon.com complete with cleaning kit for only about $10.

 

Opteka Green Cube:  More flashy than actual function, this cube sits above the camera’s retractable flash and provides leveling assistance with 3 levels (2 horizontal, 1 vertical).  It can assist when using a tripod to position either vertical or horizontal, or you are shooting without looking through the view hole.  It is completely unnecessary, but it looks so cool!  I know, I am a huge nerd, but these little things in life make me smile.  Costs around $10.

 

Along with all these cool gadgets, I have a variety of memory cards (I recommend 8GB and 16GB cards), batteries, cleaning supplies, chargers, flash units, small tripods and filters.  If you own lenses, why not protect them?  You should get UV filters for all your lenses; they do not provide much other than protection, but that is priceless when you bang your lens into a wall or handrail (well not priceless, but worth as much as your lens you protected…).  There are other odds and ends here and there, but this is the bulk of my arsenal.  If you have any questions, want recommendations please feel free to post below!  thanks for reading (for those that still are…) Check out B&H Photo for the best deals on all this equipment!


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